Going back in time…

Spring planting - Gabrielle Nowicki

Spring Planting, 2011. Graphite on paper

This is an older drawing. I was a finalist the Manifest Gallery’s INDA 5 (international drawing annual 5) publication. This drawing was included in the annual. You can see the online version of my page here

The reason I’m posting it is because for some time, I’ve wanted to revisit this drawing and the idea behind it. I had plans to work on a series of drawings relating to it but that never happened.

Usually, detailed drawing leaves me squirmy, I haven’t the patience to sit still long enough. Ideas come to me fast and I like to get them out of my head and into the world. Drawings like this take a long time and require gobs of patience.

This past winter has been a down time for me. The passing of my father and other things happening in my life have made this a time of reflection. The ideas have slowed down although when they do happen, I write them down in my journal/sketchbook

I am presently working on a drawing relating to this one, that I’d planned a few years ago. Rather than finding it tedious, I’m embracing the meditative quality of the repetitive technique and attention to detail. The graphite seems to polish the surface of the paper, it is soothing and stills my mind.

Through this patience, I’m gradually seeing the forms in the drawing take shape. I should probably take this as a life lesson.

Thinking, building and drawing upon collage

st melangell 2 - gabrielle nowicki collage

St Melangell – Mixed Media Drawing

gabrielle nowicki collage, mixed media drawing

The Fabric of who we are – Mixed Media Drawing

I’ve been thinking, building and drawing upon on some of the collages I’d made in my year long collage a day project, from November 2014 – November 2015. I’m still fascinated with the little pieces of paper I was using in them. To me, the little bits of paper are meaningful in different ways. Sometimes they’re found in my sea collages with the boats in them. There, the web of pieces in the sea reminds me of the plastics in our oceans and lakes, how a walk along the beach will show you bits of ribbon from balloons, plastic pop and water bottle caps, broken toys and other refuse. Other times, as in the images above, the pieces become more personal. They are literally, a part of our fabric of who we are, a quilt of our experiences. Either way, the pieces are ephemera of physical and emotional history.

I’ve been spending quite a bit of time lately, reflecting about my parents, and my childhood. It’s amazing how much we are products of a complex mesh of experiences and the time in which we live.

On My Desk

triptych_WEB
Gabrielle Nowicki Art series "Found"

After a needed break from all the busy-ness (is that a word?) of the ARTS Project show, custom orders, Christmas and New Year’s, I went back out to the barn to look through my stock of wood, to see any piece might speak to me about what it wanted to become. To be honest, inertia won out for too long, and I procrastinated over even going out there because it’s cold and damp, and it’s much nicer to pile under a cozy mass of cats and blankets, eat shortbread, drink eggnog spiked with 40 Creek, and read. I’m stuck into the Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon, and on the third book now, Voyager.

In my previous post,  I talked about exploring my collaged world in painted form, but what happened this week surprised me. I began to paint, away from all the imagery I’d built up in the past year and away from the collage elements I’ve been incorporating. On Monday, I cut a board into 4 x 5 inch pieces, sealed them. I loved the size and weight of the pieces in my hands. I like working small and I think this size is a good scale for my imagery and approach. The portrait came first, then the hand. Yesterday, I worked on the tree. There might a couple more paintings in this series, to tell a story.

Happy Belated New Year

End of 2015 – and Miniature painting studies

It’s almost the end of 2015. The ARTS Project Crafted show is finished, and so have some custom orders that have kept me busy. Christmas and the New Year are coming and work related things are winding down for now. It feels strange to not be working toward a show, sale or order but it is liberating (as long as it doesn’t last too long).

For the past few weeks, I’ve wanted to return to painting and drawing again. To make the most of this window, I think that’s what I’ll focus on for the next little bit.

st melangell - gabrielle nowicki miniature painting
Melangell, patron saint of rabbits

 

These paintings are explorations into the world of two dimensional space and colour. I’ve been looking at my image bank of 365 collages and thinking about how to use them in painting and drawing.  So, some of these images will look familiar if you know my tumblr blog. The paintings are small, only 4″ x 5″  hence, they are the almost the same scale as the collages.

I didn’t want to apply paper to my painting surface, but I like the disjointed effect that cut and paste collage has. I wanted something more integral to the surface than glued paper so I used a gel medium transfer process to apply the cut paper imagery to the surface.

There are numerous tutorials on the web that show how to transfer printed images onto a surface using acrylic gel mediums. It involves adhering the image side of the paper to the painting surface, with acrylic gel medium and letting it thoroughly dry. Then you wet the backing paper of the image with water and gently rub the wet paper pulp off the surface to reveal the ink of the image underneath. It’s a bit tedious to do and usually the remaining image isn’t perfect, but that’s a part of the charm. I  love this because the imperfect imagery is ensuring that I keep my painting looser and rougher than I’d normally work. I have a habit of tightening up my technique when working in series, so I hope it doesn’t happen with these.

St. Melangell is the patron saint of rabbits. Go figure, who would have guessed that bunnies could be so fortunate to have their own saint to watch over them! Last year, now and then but regularly enough, white rabbits would make an appearance in my collages. Somehow, I discovered that they have a patron saint, so St. Melangell accompanies them from time to time. The image of St. Melangell holding a rabbit always makes me happy.

Circus Automata Series – The Strongest Man on earth

Circus Automata Series - The Strongest Man on Earth

This is the fourth automaton in the Circus Automata Series.

The Strongest Man on Earth is made from wood, papier mache, air dried clay and wire. The figure is mostly wood but I have built up features and details with the papier mache and air dried clay, and I’ve also carved some of the wood away.

The strong man raises and lowers his barbell when you turn the crank. He has one wide cam which is offset, running the length of the axle it’s mounted on.  The supporting wires that attach to the barbell connect underneath the floor, to a platform of wood which raises and lowers as the cam turns. The raising and lowering of the platform, in turn pushes up the wires which makes the barbell move up and down.

See all entries for the Circus Automata Series:

The Daring Serpent Goddess

The Never Seen Before Bird Woman

The Dancing Bear Child

The Strongest Man of Earth

Circus Automata Series – The Dancing Bear Child

circus automata series - dancing bear child

This is the third automaton in the Circus Automata Series.

The Dancing Bear Child is made from wood, papier mache, air dried clay and wire. The figure is mostly wood but I have built up features and details with the papier mache and air dried clay, and I’ve also carved some of the wood away.

The bear child tips from side to side when you turn the crank. He has two offset cams aligned counter to each other so when you turn the crank, when one is in up position, the other is in down position  This motion tips the bear up from side to side. He’s not as graceful at dancing as the Daring Serpent Goddess, or the Never seen Before Bird Woman, afterall, he is a bear, and bears tend to lurch an lumber. I am happy with the way this movement turned out. The bear is attached to a platform and cams tip it teeter totter style as they rotate on their axle.

See all entries for the Circus Automata Series:

The Daring Serpent Goddess

The Never Seen Before Bird Woman

The Dancing Bear Child

The Strongest Man of Earth

Circus Automata Series – The Never Seen Before Bird Woman

CIrcus Automata Series - Bird Woman

This is the second automaton in the Circus Automata Series.

The never seen before bird woman is made from wood, papier mache, air dried clay and wire. The figure is mostly wood but I have built up features and details with the papier mache and air dried clay, and I’ve also carved some of the wood away.

She spins and leaps when you turn the crank. Unlike the Daring Serpent Goddess, her cam is oval so when the long part of the oval pushes the disc she’s attached to higher, in turn, making her lift, while spinning. The disc and cam are made of wood that I’ve left a bit rough so that friction causes the disc to turn as the cam rotates on it’s axle.

See all entries for the Circus Automata Series:

The Daring Serpent Goddess

The Never Seen Before Bird Woman

The Dancing Bear Child

The Strongest Man of Earth

Circus Automata Series – The Daring Serpent Goddess.

Circus Automata Series - Daring Serpent Goddess

Throughout this year, I’ve been working on a circus automata series. There are 4 all told. These automata are designed and built by me, using reclaimed wood and metal, papier mache and air dried clay. The figures are cut out of wood, then I used carving, papier mache and air dried clay to model the features

The Daring Serpent Goddess is driven by an interior crank driven cam. When you turn the crank she spins in circles to display the snake. The disc and cam are make of wood that I’ve left a bit rough so that friction causes the disc to turn as the cam rotates on it’s axle.

See all entries for the Circus Automata Series:

The Daring Serpent Goddess

The Never Seen Before Bird Woman

The Dancing Bear Child

The Strongest Man of Earth

The ARTS Project Crafted Show

Gabrielle Nowicki, the arts project craftes show

The Crafted Show at The ARTS Project is now open, running from December 1 – 19. Last night was Meet the Artists Night, and it was fun to see the work and chat with my fellow exhibitors and visitors.

There’s a story with photos, by Keith Tomasek of the Stratford Festival Review website here 

Keith has also posted a lot more photos of last night, and additional work here

The show includes the work of the following artists:

Paul Abeleira
Hida Behzadi
Tim Cosens
Nic De Groot
Jessie Gussack
Kristi Ann Holt
Sarah Legault
Joanna Mozdzen
Gabrielle Nowicki
Angie Quick
Jen Wilson
Katie Zinc

I hope you can make it down to the ARTS Project to have a look around at this wonderful show.

Crafted: Unique Wares and Originals at The ARTS Project

December 1 – 19

Hours: Tuesday to Saturday, Noon until 5:00
Where: The ARTS Project 203 Dundas Street, London, Ontario

Phone: 519.642.2767